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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 198

Relationship between body mass index and blood pressure in school students


Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq

Date of Submission27-Jul-2018
Date of Decision10-Sep-2018
Date of Acceptance23-Sep-2018
Date of Web Publication13-Aug-2019

Correspondence Address:
Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad
Iraq
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/cjhr.cjhr_114_18

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How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Relationship between body mass index and blood pressure in school students. CHRISMED J Health Res 2019;6:198

How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Relationship between body mass index and blood pressure in school students. CHRISMED J Health Res [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Dec 6];6:198. Available from: http://www.cjhr.org/text.asp?2019/6/3/198/264370



Sir,

I read with interest the study by Jena and Pattnaik published in the July 2018 issue of CHRISMED J Health Res.[1] From January 2016 to December 2016, the authors measured the height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure (BP) of a cohort including Indian students of age group 6–12 years of both genders. On employing American standards for BMI and BP percentiles, the authors found that there was significantly higher BP in overweight and obese participants than healthy weight individuals. There was a positive correlation between BMI and both systolic and diastolic BP.[1] They concluded that overweight and obesity were associated with hypertension.[1] I presume that these results ought to be cautiously interpreted. The authors addressed few study limitations related to the size of the studied cohort, socioeconomic status of the parents, and dietary habits of the participants. I presume that the following methodological limitation might be additionally relevant. It is obvious that country-specific standards are more faithful in describing a given measurement. The impact of the methodological limitation on the accuracy of the study results could be explained in dual aspects. On the one hand, the revised Indian Academy of Pediatrics (IAP) growth charts for weight, height, and BMI for assessing the growth of 5–18-year old Indian children have been launched in 2015 replacing the previous 2007 IAP charts.[2] On the other hand, simplified reference tables and charts, formulae for systolic BP and diastolic BP, and simple convenient thresholds for Indian school children have been released in 2015 to be employed in the clinical setting and researches.[3] I wonder why the authors referred in their study to the American percentiles of BMI and BP instead of Indian standards. I presume that if they employed national standards, different results might be obtained. Despite the aforementioned limitations, the overall reported prevalence of hypertension (6.45%) among overweight/obese children [1] is substantial. Strategic programs are, therefore, needed to contain the further rise in the prevalence of pediatric overweight/obesity and hypertension.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Jena SK, Pattnaik M. Relationship between body mass index and blood pressure in school students. CHRISMED J Health Res 2018;5:187-90.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Indian Academy of Pediatrics Growth Charts Committee, Khadilkar V, Yadav S, Agrawal KK, Tamboli S, Banerjee M, et al. Revised IAP growth charts for height, weight and body mass index for 5- to 18-year-old Indian children. Indian Pediatr 2015;52:47-55.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Narang R, Saxena A, Ramakrishnan S, Dwivedi SN, Bagga A. Oscillometric blood pressure in Indian school children: Simplified percentile tables and charts. Indian Pediatr 2015;52:939-45.  Back to cited text no. 3
    




 

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