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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 250

Neonatal morbidity and mortality in a rural tertiary hospital in Nigeria


Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq

Date of Web Publication17-Jul-2018

Correspondence Address:
Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad
Iraq
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/cjhr.cjhr_31_18

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How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Neonatal morbidity and mortality in a rural tertiary hospital in Nigeria. CHRISMED J Health Res 2018;5:250

How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Neonatal morbidity and mortality in a rural tertiary hospital in Nigeria. CHRISMED J Health Res [serial online] 2018 [cited 2020 Apr 5];5:250. Available from: http://www.cjhr.org/text.asp?2018/5/3/250/236894



Sir,

I read with interest the case report by Abdullahi published in the January 2018 issue of CHRISMED J Health Res.[1] The author mentioned that the major causes of morbidity were neonatal sepsis (32.2%), birth asphyxia (29.3%), prematurity (18.5%), neonatal jaundice (9.3%), and hemorrhagic disease of newborn (2.4%) while the major causes of mortality were birth asphyxia (40.6%), neonatal sepsis (25%), prematurity (18.8%), and neonatal jaundice (9.4%).[1] Surprisingly, no proportion of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related morbidity and mortality was reported among the studied population. I presume that its actual proportion was underestimated. My presumption is based on the following points. To my knowledge, HIV epidemic runs among Sub-Saharan countries, including Nigeria. Nigeria accounts for 9% of the global HIV burden and is a signatory to the Millennium Development Goals as well as the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals.[2] The available data pointed out to the substantial HIV prevalence (4.9%) among pregnant women in Nigeria.[3] Vertical transmission of HIV is the most common cause of acquiring HIV infection in neonates and the available data reported 22% rate of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Nigeria.[4] As testing for HIV based on serology in neonates born to potentially HIV-infected mothers is not precise because of the presence of maternal antibodies, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is pivotal for early HIV diagnosis in neonates in Nigeria.[5] Because it is an expensive test, I presume that HIV-PCR technique was not included in the investigation panel among the studied population probably due to financial constraints. This might render the actual proportion of HIV-related morbidity and mortality underestimated by Abdullahi.[1]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Abdullahi UI. Neonatal morbidity and mortality in a rural tertiary hospital in Nigeria. CHRISMED J Health Res 2018;5:8-10.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Akinwande O, Bashorun A, Azeez A, Agbo F, Dakum P, Abimiku A, et al. A decade of monitoring HIV epidemics in Nigeria: Positioning for post-2015 agenda. AIDS Behav 2017;21:62-71.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Opaleye OO, Igboama MC, Ojo JA, Odewale G. Seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV, and HTLV among pregnant women in Southwestern Nigeria. J Immunoassay Immunochem 2016;37:29-42.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Audu RA, Salu OB, Musa AZ, Onyewuche J, Funso-Adebayo EO, Iroha EO, et al. Estimation of the rate of mother to child transmission of HIV in Nigeria. Afr J Med Med Sci 2006;35:121-4.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Lukong CS, Tshimwanga ED, Mfuh AY. The role of polymerase chain reaction in early diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus infection in infants. Ann Afr Med 2013;12:232-5.  Back to cited text no. 5
  [Full text]  




 

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