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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 292

Springboard program: A ray of hope for the empowerment of victims of child marriage in Yemen


Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication11-Oct-2017

Correspondence Address:
Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/cjhr.cjhr_4_17

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Springboard program: A ray of hope for the empowerment of victims of child marriage in Yemen. CHRISMED J Health Res 2017;4:292

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Springboard program: A ray of hope for the empowerment of victims of child marriage in Yemen. CHRISMED J Health Res [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 Apr 6];4:292. Available from: http://www.cjhr.org/text.asp?2017/4/4/292/216474

Sir,

The social practice of child marriage has continued for many centuries, and in more than one–way, it has stalled the growth and development of the society as well as the nation.[1] Even in the 21st century amidst the impending globalization and urbanization, child marriages are extremely frequent with close to 40,000 being reported each day across the world.[2] Furthermore, the practice is quite common in low-resource settings and among people with poor financial status, as often parents themselves decides to get their daughters married at an early age either for reducing their own responsibility to provide them with their basic needs or in exchange of financial benefits.[1],[2],[3]

Almost in all cases, child marriage is one of the worst nightmares for a girl, who is robbed of her childhood and is left with no option to have an independent life.[1],[2],[3] In addition, these girls have limited access to medical care, wealth, education, or property as compared to their men counterparts for the solitary reason that they are women.[2],[3],[4],[5] Moreover, the practice of child marriage increases disproportionately in settings with poor law and order or regions affected by some form of conflicts, the women in Yemen are highly vulnerable.[3],[4] As a matter of fact, due to the ongoing conflicts in the nation, the life of women and girls is extremely difficult, with most of the families opting for child marriage to respond to the ever-growing hardships.[3]

As the local government is facing many other issues, the United Nations Population Fund, along with the support of other partners has initiated the Springboard Programme in the nation.[4] The primary target of the initiative is to focus on women living in displacement and grants have been arranged to aid vulnerable women with income-generation activities.[4]

Even though, the initiative is not new and is being operated in more than 30 nations currently, the launch of the program is a crucial step to assist women who are seeking help for the injustices which they have been exposed.[4] The ultimate aim is to ensure empowerment of the vulnerable women, both from the social as well as the financial perspective.[4] Moreover, trainers have been appointed to aid women in setting their personal and professional goals and then supporting them by developing the required skills to attain the set targets.[4] At the same time, the program even supports the education of these girls and women to enable them to pursue their dreams.[4],[5]

To conclude, the practice of child marriage has been associated with detrimental effects on the lives of a girl. It is high time that appropriate actions are taken to support them in bringing their life back on track by aiming for their empowerment.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Ending child marriage: Battling for a girl's right to choose. Prim Health Care 2016;6:e114.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
World Health Organization. Child Marriages: 39,000 Every Day; 2013. Available from: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2013/child_marriage_20130307/en/. [Last accessed on 2017 Jan 10].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
AlAmodi AA. Child marriage in Yemen. Lancet 2013;382:1979-80.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
UNFPA. After Marriage at Age 9, a Former Child Bride Gets a Second Chance; 2016. Available from: http://www.unfpa.org/news/after-marriage-age-9-former-child-bride-gets-second-chance. [Last accessed on 2017 Jan 10].  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Kalamar AM, Lee-Rife S, Hindin MJ. Interventions to prevent child marriage among young people in low – And middle-income countries: A systematic review of the published and gray literature. J Adolesc Health 2016;59 3 Suppl:S16-21.  Back to cited text no. 5
    



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