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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 291

Recommendations to promote safe and effective use of contraceptives: World Health Organization


Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication11-Oct-2017

Correspondence Address:
Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/cjhr.cjhr_120_16

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Recommendations to promote safe and effective use of contraceptives: World Health Organization. CHRISMED J Health Res 2017;4:291

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Recommendations to promote safe and effective use of contraceptives: World Health Organization. CHRISMED J Health Res [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 Apr 6];4:291. Available from: http://www.cjhr.org/text.asp?2017/4/4/291/216464

Sir,

Globally, the benefits attributed to family planning methods go way beyond the prevention of unwanted births or ensuring spacing between children.[1] It has been regarded as one of the most cost-effective means to minimize financial burden on the parents, decrease the load on the health-care delivery system (viz., reduction in the chances of unwanted childbirths, abortion, and incidence of sexually transmitted infections), reduce the potential risk of violation of human rights (especially of the unwanted child), spread happiness in the family, and eventually in the growth of the community and the nation.[1] Nevertheless, the estimates from developing nations alone suggest that in excess of 220 million women have an unmet need for family planning, which is an alarming fact.[1],[2]

Considering the available estimates and the lacunae in the family planning, especially in the low- and middle-income nations, there is an indispensable need to support and strengthen national family planning programs through more investment and better awareness among the general population.[2],[3] At the same time, all efforts should be taken to create an environment, in which people are given an option to choose from a wide range of contraceptives.[3] In addition, there is a great need to empower both the health workers and the beneficiaries regarding the risk and benefits of each method, ensure training of the health workers, and the development of a provider-user relationship based on the principles of respect, privacy, and confidentiality.[1],[2],[3],[4]

To assist national policy makers, the World Health Organization has periodically released recommendations for the contraceptive use and the eligibility criteria for the same.[3],[4] These eligibility criteria identify those conditions, in which the advantages of using contraceptives outweigh the risks, and at the same time, ascertain those conditions, in which a significant health risk might precipitate due to the administration of the contraceptive method.[5] The ultimate idea is to promote the usage of correct contraceptive with regard to specific health condition or attributes, so as to enhance their acceptance among the beneficiaries.[3],[4]

Moreover, in the recently released selective recommendations to promote the safe and effective use of contraceptives, the underlying principle is to improve the quality of care in family planning for both men and women.[4] It encompasses different aspects of the contraceptives, ranging from their initiation or continuation, incorrect use, and problems encountered during their usage and approach to respond to the same.[4] The document provides recommendations for combined hormonal contraceptive use (oral, injectable, transdermal patch, and vaginal ring), intrauterine devices, implants, progestogen-only pills, emergency contraception, and male sterilization.[4]

To conclude, it is extremely essential to promote the usage of correct contraceptive methods among the beneficiaries based on their individual attributes so that not only the expected benefits result but also the risk of any potential adverse health consequences is neutralized.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
World Health Organization. Family Planning/Contraception – Fact Sheet No. 351; 2016. Available from: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs351/en/ [Last accessed on 2016 Dec 14].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. World Health Organization introduces a new digital tool to address the unmet needs for family planning among postpartum women. Sifa Med J 2016;3:60-1.  Back to cited text no. 2
  [Full text]  
3.
World Health Organization. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use. 5th ed. Geneva: WHO Press; 2015. p. 1-26.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
World Health Organization. Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use. 3rd ed. Geneva: WHO Press; 2016. p. 1-14.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Gaffield ML, Kiarie J. WHO medical eligibility criteria update. Contraception 2016;94:193-4.  Back to cited text no. 5
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